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  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p>TRIVIA BITS: November 18, 2019</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>The Caribbean island nation of Dominica is the only country with a parrot on its national flag. Specifically, it&rsquo;s a Sisserou parrot, an endangered species found only in the rainforests of Dominica. The flag was designed in 1978 when Dominica became independent from the United Kingdom. At the time, the purple-breasted parrot had its back to the flagpole. Ten years later, the parrot was turned to face the flagpole, which is how it stands today.</p>\n<p> DURING her 66-day journey aboard the Mayflower in 1620, Elizabeth Hopkins gave birth to a son. She named the baby Oceanus, which seems appropriate for a baby born at sea. Shortly after the pilgrims arrived in New England, Susanna White gave birth to a son she named Peregrine, from the Latin for traveler.<br />\n Telling males from females in a group of pilgrim geese is easy to do. Males are born with yellow- to silver-gray feathers and orange bills. As adults, they&rsquo;re pure white. Females are born with gray feathers and brown bills that turn orange as the bird matures. Adult females are gray with a sprinkling of white around the eyes. What&rsquo;s harder to determine is where pilgrim geese come from. Popular legend says they arrived with the pilgrims from England, but it&rsquo;s more likely pilgrim geese were developed by an American poultry breeder in the 1930s.<br />\n In a historical account from Pliny the Elder, Cleopatra bets Marc Antony that she can serve the most expensive meal imaginable. When he agrees to the wager, she presents a huge banquet. Then, for dessert, she orders a cup of vinegar into which she drops one of her priceless pearl earrings. The pearl dissolves, and she drinks the vinegar, thereby winning the bet. Pearls are made of calcium carbonate, the active ingredient in Rolaids and Tums. So, if that ancient story is true, Cleopatra washed down her feast with the world&rsquo;s most expensive antacid.</p>\n<p> NOBEL Prize-winning author Toni Morrison once remarked on the dearth of monuments commemorating the lives of enslaved people in the United States. Not even a &ldquo;bench by the road,&rdquo; she said. And that was the impetus for the Toni Morrison Society Bench By the Road Project, which places black steel memorial benches at sites of significance in black American history. The first was installed in 2008 at Sullivan&rsquo;s Island, South Carolina, the landing point for nearly half the captured Africans who were sold into slavery in the United States.<br />\n At the first modern Olympic games in Athens in 1896, Germany&rsquo;s Carl Schuhmann competed in four separate disciplines: gymnastics, athletics, weightlifting and Greco-Roman wrestling. He went home with four top prizes, three in gymnastics and one in wrestling. His career in competitive gymnastics continued right up to the 1936 Berlin games, where, at age 66, he took part in a gymnastics exhibition.</p>\n<p> TRIVIA<br />\n 1. Doctor Dolittle&rsquo;s parrot shares what name with a Pacific Island location?<br />\n A) Caroline<br />\n B) Marshall<br />\n C) Polynesia<br />\n D) Yap</p>\n<p> 2. Which ship attempted to sail with the Mayflower to the New World in 1620?<br />\n A) Mary Rose<br />\n B) Speedwell<br />\n C) Susan Constant<br />\n D) Valiant</p>\n<p> 3. The Franklin, the Reeve and the Miller are pilgrim characters in what written work?<br />\n A) &ldquo;The Canterbury Tales&rdquo;<br />\n B) &ldquo;The Mayflower Compact&rdquo;<br />\n C) &ldquo;Perceval, the Story of the Grail&rdquo;<br />\n D) &ldquo;The Pilgrim&rsquo;s Progress&rdquo;</p>\n<p> 4. Grand Ole Opry star Minnie Pearl wore a straw hat with what dangling from the brim?<br />\n A) Fruit<br />\n B) Guitar picks<br />\n C) A price tag<br />\n D) Ribbons</p>\n<p> 5. Ratified in December 1865, which amendment to the U.S. Constitution abolished slavery?<br />\n A) 13th<br />\n B) 15th<br />\n C) 18th<br />\n D) 21st</p>\n<p> 6. Which novelist was named an &ldquo;Outstanding American&rdquo; by the National Wrestling Hall of Fame?<br />\n A) Ernest Hemingway<br />\n B) John Irving<br />\n C) Joyce Carol Oates<br />\n D) John Updike</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>\n ANSWERS<br />\n 1) Doctor Dolittle owned a parrot named Polynesia.<br />\n 2) The Speedwell set sail with the Mayflower to the New World in 1620 but had to turn back for repairs.<br />\n 3) The Franklin, the Reeve and the Miller are characters in &ldquo;The Canterbury Tales.&rdquo;<br />\n 4) Minnie Pearl&rsquo;s famous straw hat had a $1.98 price tag dangling from the brim.<br />\n 5) The 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution abolished slavery and involuntary servitude.<br />\n 6) Novelist and wrestling coach John Irving was named an &ldquo;Outstanding American&rdquo; by the National Wrestling Hall of Fame.</p>\n', created = 1574391458, expire = 1574477858, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:4781e0b341c4dbc0d3fd39fdb647b9cb' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
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  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p>TRIVIA BITS: November 11, 2019</p>\n<p>Whether American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) are born male or female depends on the temperature where the eggs incubate before they hatch. Below 86 degrees Fahrenheit, they&rsquo;ll all be female. Above 91.2 degrees, they&rsquo;ll be male. At temperatures in between, the hatchlings will be a mix of males and females. Biologists call this phenomenon temperature-dependent sex determination, and it&rsquo;s not unusual in egg-bearing reptiles including turtles.</p>\n<p> IN NOV. 1898, Harper&rsquo;s Bazaar magazine recommended turtleneck sweaters for the active woman &ldquo;who makes up her mind to keep up her bicycle-riding as regularly as possible,&rdquo; even when &ldquo;the winds are growing keen and the frost is in the air.&rdquo; English writer-actor Noel Coward often gets credit for popularizing turtlenecks as casual menswear in the 1920s, and the classic New York department store Best &amp; Co. declared them a women&rsquo;s fashion must-have for fall in 1924.<br />\n Kolyma Highway extends about 1,260 miles between Nizhny Bestyakh and Magadan in Russia&rsquo;s desolate, brutally cold Far East region. The route was intended to give access to the gold mines in Magadan, but working on its construction was equivalent to a death sentence for the prisoners from the Stalinist Gulag labor camps, who built it using hand implements. Hundreds of thousands who died there were buried beside the road or in the roadbed itself, which is why Kolyma Highway is also known as the Road of Bones.<br />\n Cranberry growers don&rsquo;t judge a berry only by its color. They use the bounce test. Small pockets of air inside the berries make them bounce. Ripe, firm berries will bounce on a wooden surface. Rotten berries fall flat. The air pockets also make cranberries float in water, which is helpful during harvesting in cranberry bogs.</p>\n<p> THE PACIFIC island nation of Nauru has a total area of about 8 square miles &mdash; about one-tenth the area of Toledo, Ohio &mdash; and a population that hovers around 10,500. It&rsquo;s so small it doesn&rsquo;t have an official capital city. It also doesn&rsquo;t have its own currency &mdash; it uses the Australian dollar. But it has its own airline and its own distinct language. It also has another national distinction: Thanks to a generally unhealthy diet and sedentary lifestyle, Nauru has the world&rsquo;s highest obesity rate per capita.<br />\n &ldquo;The Sorcerer&rsquo;s Apprentice&rdquo; is the best-known work by French composer Paul Dukas. (Remember the multiplying broomsticks in Walt Disney&rsquo;s 1940 classic &ldquo;Fantasia&rdquo;?) His other compositions include the opera &ldquo;Ariane et Barbe-bleue&rdquo; (&ldquo;Ariadne and Bluebeard&rdquo;) and a piece called &ldquo;Villanelle&rdquo; written especially for the French horn. Only 13 of his works were published in his lifetime, and just one more was published after his death. A highly regarded teacher and music critic, Dukas was such a perfectionist that he destroyed the rest of his manuscripts, rather than have them published for posterity.</p>\n<p> TRIVIA<br />\n 1. Which tennis hall-of-famer was nicknamed &ldquo;The Crocodile&rdquo;?<br />\n A) Rene Lacoste<br />\n B) Ivan Lendl<br />\n C) Suzanne Lenglen<br />\n D) Fred Perry</p>\n<p> 2. Developed by David Bushnell, the Turtle was what type of device for military use?<br />\n A) Combat helmet<br />\n B) Cooking pot<br />\n C) Submarine<br />\n D) Tank</p>\n<p> 3. Which Pacific port city in Russia has a name that means &ldquo;Ruler of the East&rdquo;?<br />\n A) Arkhangelsk<br />\n B) Novosibirsk<br />\n C) Sochi<br />\n D) Vladivostok</p>\n<p> 4. How do cranberries grow?<br />\n A) On bushes<br />\n B) On trees<br />\n C) Underground<br />\n D) On vines</p>\n<p> 5. What&rsquo;s depicted on the reverse of the Australian $1 coin?<br />\n A) Five kangaroos<br />\n B) Sydney Opera House<br />\n C) Three koalas<br />\n D) Uluru</p>\n<p> 6. Reader Peter Clark asks, &ldquo;What is Paul McCartney&rsquo;s real first name?&rdquo;<br />\n A) James<br />\n B) John<br />\n C) Michael<br />\n D) Richard</p>\n<p> Answers on page 19</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>\n ANSWERS<br />\n 1) French tennis champion Rene Lacoste was nicknamed &ldquo;The Crocodile.&rdquo;<br />\n 2) The Turtle, a submarine used during the American Revolution, was invented by David Bushnell.<br />\n 3) Vladivostok means &ldquo;ruler of the East.&rdquo;<br />\n 4) Cranberries grow on vines.<br />\n 5) Five kangaroos are depicted on the reverse of the Australian $1 coin.<br />\n 6) Paul McCartney was born James Paul McCartney on June 18, 1942.</p>\n', created = 1574391458, expire = 1574477858, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:49acd8675ae972870604eccf40906de5' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
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  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p>TRIVIA BITS: November 4, 2019</p>\n<p>Akira Kurosawa, legendary director of &ldquo;Rashomon&rdquo; and &ldquo;Seven Samurai&rdquo; (which inspired the western classic &ldquo;The Magnificent Seven&rdquo;), was a baseball fan. In fact, his 1949 noir film &ldquo;Stray Dog&rdquo; has a pivotal scene at a baseball game between the Yomiuri Giants and the Nankai Hawks &mdash; the top two pro teams in Japan in 1948. As a boy, Kurosawa pitched and played shortstop. &ldquo;My liking for baseball is deep-rooted,&rdquo; he once wrote, &ldquo;apparently I&rsquo;ve been watching it since babyhood.&rdquo;</p>\n<p> THE FIRST licensed commercial radio station in the United States, KDKA in Pittsburgh, officially began broadcasting on Nov. 2, 1920. That wasn&rsquo;t a randomly selected date. It was Election Day, and the evening marked the first broadcast of presidential election results. Republican Warren G. Harding defeated Democrat James M. Cox. When Harding took the oath of office on Mar. 4, 1921, he became the first U.S. president whose inaugural address was broadcast live on the radio.<br />\n The sperm whale is easy to identify because of its enormous square head. That head contains the largest brain of any creature on Earth. A sperm whale&rsquo;s brain weighs about 17 pounds. By comparison, the human brain typically weighs about 3 pounds.<br />\n On Nov. 10, 1766, William Franklin, colonial governor of New Jersey (and son of Benjamin Franklin) signed the charter establishing Queen&rsquo;s College, which would become the foundation of Rutgers University. Its original purpose was training young men to enter the ministry of the Dutch Reformed Church.</p>\n<p> ONE OF the more recognizable monuments at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point is a ring of 13 iron links, each more than 2 feet long and weighing about 100 pounds. They were part of a 1,500-foot-long chain that stretched across the Hudson River &mdash; supported by log rafts &mdash; as a barrier to British ships during the Revolutionary War. After the war, the chain was dismantled. Some of the links, including the ones at West Point, were saved. The rest were melted down.<br />\n Two common interests unite classical composer Sergei Prokofiev with Robert Fitzgerald Diggs and Gary Grice, aka RZA and GZA of Wu-Tang Clan. One is music; the other is chess. Prokofiev played against grandmasters and other classical music giants including composer Maurice Ravel. RZA and GZA play chess competitively, and their music often contains chess references. The long list of chess-playing music stars includes Ray Charles, Dizzy Gillespie, Willie Nelson, Sting and Bob Dylan. The band Phish is so into chess that the members have played matches with the audience during concerts.</p>\n<p> TRIVIA<br />\n 1. Nintendo was founded in 1889 to manufacture what type of product?<br />\n A) Automobiles<br />\n B) Beer<br />\n C) Playing cards<br />\n D) Power tools<br />\n 2. Which soap opera ran for 72 seasons, starting on the radio in 1937 and moving to TV in 1952?<br />\n A) &ldquo;All My Children&rdquo;<br />\n B) &ldquo;Days of Our Lives&rdquo;<br />\n C) &ldquo;The Guiding Light&rdquo;<br />\n D) &ldquo;One Life to Live&rdquo;<br />\n 3. Before they had a show of their own, Pinky and the Brain appeared in recurring segments on what animated series?<br />\n A) &ldquo;Animaniacs&rdquo;<br />\n B) &ldquo;Captain Planet and the Planeteers&rdquo;<br />\n C) &ldquo;DuckTales&rdquo;<br />\n D) &ldquo;Tiny Toon Adventures&rdquo;<br />\n 4. New Brunswick is one of Canada&rsquo;s three Maritime Provinces. What are the other two?<br />\n A) Alberta and Manitoba<br />\n B) Ontario and Nova Scotia<br />\n C) Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island<br />\n D) Nunavut and Yukon<br />\n 5. Who is the only U.S. president to have graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis?<br />\n A) Jimmy Carter<br />\n B) Grover Cleveland<br />\n C) James K. Polk<br />\n D) Woodrow Wilson<br />\n 6. Reader Phil Schwimmer asks, &ldquo;How many possibilities are there for a chess player&rsquo;s first move?&rdquo;<br />\n A) 8<br />\n B) 12<br />\n C) 16<br />\n D) 20</p>\n<p> ANSWERS<br />\n 1) Nintendo originally made and sold playing cards.<br />\n 2) &ldquo;The Guiding Light&rdquo; ran for 72 years, first on radio and then on TV. It was canceled in 2009.<br />\n 3) Pinky and the Brain were recurring characters on &ldquo;Animaniacs.&rdquo;<br />\n 4) New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island are Canada&rsquo;s Maritime Provinces.<br />\n 5) President Jimmy Carter was a member of the U.S. Naval Academy class of 1947.<br />\n 6) There are 20 possible first moves for a chess player: 16 pawn moves and four knight moves.</p>\n', created = 1574391458, expire = 1574477858, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:192013f8c5cd670a4bfce58e67119912' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
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  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p>TRIVIA BITS: October 28, 2019</p>\n<p>If you&rsquo;re the sort of person who enjoys spotting goofs in major motion pictures, pay attention to the car license plates on screen. You&rsquo;ll never run out of goofs to spot, from plates with the wrong design for the movie&rsquo;s time period, to that pesky question of which states require front plates and which don&rsquo;t. One of the best-known license plate goofs comes from the 1978 horror movie &ldquo;Halloween.&rdquo; It&rsquo;s set in Illinois, but the characters drive cars with California plates. Oops.</p>\n<p> IN 1873, when architects Paul J. Pelz and John L. Smithmeyer won the commission to design the Library of Congress building in Washington, D.C., Pelz was the chief draftsman for the United States Lighthouse Board. He might have wished he&rsquo;d kept that reliable day job. Congress took 13 years to approve the start of construction, and as late as 1900, the Library of Congress architects were still awaiting payment for their work.<br />\n The first year the National Hurricane Center used women&rsquo;s names to designate hurricanes originating in the Atlantic Ocean was 1953. That list started with a storm called Alice, which passed through Florida in June, and ended with Irene, which hit the Lesser Antilles in December. The same list of names was reused in 1954, when Hurricane Carol caused so much destruction in New York and New England it became the first storm to have its name &ldquo;retired.&rdquo; Since 1979, the list has alternated women&rsquo;s and men&rsquo;s names.<br />\n Jacques Plante of the Montreal Canadiens was the first National Hockey League goalie to wear a face mask in league play. It was in November 1959 during a game between the Canadiens and the New York Rangers. Today, the NHL requires goalies to wear masks. Back then, even after Plante&rsquo;s move, some players still opted to face the consequences without protection. The last NHL goalie to play without a mask was Andy Brown, who ended his NHL career with the Pittsburgh Penguins in 1974.<br />\n &ldquo;The Thousand and One Nights&rdquo; is a collection of folktales from different sources in Asia and the Middle East, shared first by ancient storytellers and then written down in the 9th century. What unites them is the tale of Scheherazade, a clever woman married to a vengeful king. Knowing he plans to kill her, she tells him the stories of &ldquo;Aladdin,&rdquo; &ldquo;Sinbad the Sailor&rdquo; and &ldquo;Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves,&rdquo; among many others, which entertain the king and ultimately save her life.</p>\n<p> VERMONT&rsquo;S Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historic Park was the boyhood home of the 19th century environmentalist-writer George Perkins Marsh. The estate was later purchased by lawyer and conservation advocate Frederick Billings and, through his descendants, became the property of the Rockefeller family before it was deeded to the National Park Service. The park grounds include the oldest managed forest in the United States and, oddly, two nuclear fallout shelters &mdash; one under the main house and one under the bowling alley &mdash; that were added to the property in the 1960s.</p>\n<p> TRIVIA<br />\n 1. The fictional planned community of Cuesta Verde, California, was the setting for which scary movie?<br />\n A) &ldquo;Child&rsquo;s Play&rdquo;<br />\n B) &ldquo;Friday the 13th&rdquo;<br />\n C) &ldquo;A Nightmare on Elm Street&rdquo;<br />\n D) &ldquo;Poltergeist&rdquo;<br />\n 2. Whose personal collection of 6,487 books was the foundation of today&rsquo;s Library of Congress?<br />\n A) King George III<br />\n B) William Randolph Hearst<br />\n C) Thomas Jefferson<br />\n D) Theodore Roosevelt<br />\n 3. Who won a best actress Oscar for her role in the 1974 film &ldquo;Alice Doesn&rsquo;t Live Here Anymore&rdquo;?<br />\n A) Ellen Burstyn<br />\n B) Louise Fletcher<br />\n C) Diane Keaton<br />\n D) Sissy Spacek<br />\n 4. The NHL&rsquo;s annual award for the &ldquo;goalkeeper adjudged to be the best at his position&rdquo; is named for whom?<br />\n A) Frank Calder<br />\n B) Marie Evelyn Moreton (Lady Byng)<br />\n C) Art Ross<br />\n D) Georges Vezina<br />\n 5. Which Middle Eastern capital is nicknamed the City of Jasmine because of the flowers that grow there?<br />\n A) Amman<br />\n B) Beirut<br />\n C) Damascus<br />\n D) Jerusalem<br />\n 6. Which U.S. president is buried in Plymouth Notch, Vermont?<br />\n A) Chester A. Arthur<br />\n B) Calvin Coolidge<br />\n C) Franklin Pierce<br />\n D) John Tyler</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>\n ANSWERS<br />\n 1) The community of Cuesta Verde was the setting for &ldquo;Poltergeist.&rdquo;<br />\n 2) In 1815, Thomas Jefferson&rsquo;s personal library was acquired as the foundation for the Library of Congress.<br />\n 3) Ellen Burstyn won an Oscar for her role as Alice in &ldquo;Alice Doesn&rsquo;t Live Here Anymore.&rdquo;<br />\n 4) The NHL&rsquo;s annual award for the &ldquo;goalkeeper adjudged to be the best at his position&rdquo; is named for Georges Vezina.<br />\n 5) Damascus, Syria, is nicknamed the City of Jasmine.<br />\n 6) Calvin Coolidge is buried in Plymouth Notch, Vermont.</p>\n', created = 1574391458, expire = 1574477858, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:f2082a30d602d5deca8ae649ceaac855' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
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  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p>TRIVIA BITS: October 21, 2019</p>\n<p>In 2016, Portugal won the Union of European Footbal Associations soccer championship; superstar player Cristiano Ronaldo topped the Forbes magazine list of the world&rsquo;s highest paid athletes; and the airport in his hometown of Funchal on the island of Madeira was renamed in his honor. With that, Ronaldo joined a short list of athletes with namesake airports. Among others: soccer star George Best in Belfast, Northern Ireland; ancient Olympic boxer Diagoras on the Greek island of Rhodes; and great American golfer Arnold Palmer in Latrobe, Pennsylvania.</p>\n<p> THE TALL, pointed headdress we associate with fairytale princesses is called a &ldquo;hennin.&rdquo; They were all the rage in the mid-15th century, especially in France, where fashionable ladies wore hennins 3 feet tall with a veil attached to the tip. A woman could fold the veil under one arm or let it float behind her like angel wings when she walked. To accentuate the look, she&rsquo;d tuck as much of her hair as she could inside the hennin and then shave off stray strands from her forehead and temples.<br />\n Rabies, swine flu and avian flu are diseases transmitted from animals to humans, often with fatal consequences. But sometimes the transmission goes the other way. Animals in zoos -- especially primates -- have died from influenza and other viruses they picked up from humans. There&rsquo;s even some evidence that humans with H1N1 &ldquo;swine flu&rdquo; passed that virus back to healthy pig population and made them sick, too.</p>\n<p> Before he developed the telegraph and the code that bears his name, Samuel F.B. Morse (F.B. stands for Finley Breese) was an accomplished painter who trained at the Royal Academy of Art in London. His &ldquo;Gallery of the Louvre&rdquo; depicts all of that museum&rsquo;s great works -- including the &ldquo;Mona Lisa&rdquo; -- hung in a single room. His portrait of John Adams -- for which he was paid $25 in 1816 -- is in the collection of the Brooklyn Museum. His portrait of James Monroe hangs in the Blue Room of the White House.<br />\n &ldquo;Candy Land&rdquo; was devised by Eleanor Abbott of San Diego in the 1940s, while she was recuperating from polio. Hard as it was for her to be confined to a hospital ward as an adult, she knew it was even harder for the children there with her. So she invented a board game that could be played to pass the time. The rules were simple enough for 3-year-olds -- no reading required. Abbott pitched the game to Milton Bradley, which brought out its first edition of &ldquo;Candy Land&rdquo; in 1949.</p>\n<p> THE FIRST designated military camouflage unit in modern history was formed in the French army in 1915 under the direction of a painter named Lucien-Victor Guirand de Scevola. Its main objective was to disguise ground artillery so it wouldn&rsquo;t be spotted and destroyed by aerial bombers in World War I. By 1918, the French military camouflage section employed 3,000 officers and troops at the front, plus a few hundred German prisoners of war, and some 10,000 civilian women &ldquo;camoufleurs&rdquo; at a studio in Paris.</p>\n<p> TRIVIA<br />\n 1. Lambert-St. Louis International Airport is named for Albert Bond Lambert, an aviation pioneer with what other distinction?<br />\n A) Major League Baseball player<br />\n B) Olympic athlete<br />\n C) Performed the first successful kidney transplant<br />\n D) U.S. secretary of state</p>\n<p> 2. Cary Elwes, John Cleese, Sean Connery and Russell Crowe all have played what role on screen?<br />\n A) King Henry VIII<br />\n B) Moses<br />\n C) Robin Hood<br />\n D) Sherlock Holmes</p>\n<p> 3. What type of animal is Ranger Rick, the National Wildlife Federation mascot?<br />\n A) Bear<br />\n B) Dog<br />\n C) Raccoon<br />\n D) Skunk</p>\n<p> 4. In Morse code, one dot signifies the letter E. What does one dash signify?<br />\n A) A<br />\n B) O<br />\n C) S<br />\n D) T</p>\n<p> 5. What nonprofit organization was founded by Candy Lightner in Oct. 1980?<br />\n A) Doctors Without Borders<br />\n B) Human Rights Watch<br />\n C) MADD (Mothers Against Drunk Driving)<br />\n D) Teach for America</p>\n<p> 6. What was pictured on the uniform insignias of both the French and American camouflage units in World War I?<br />\n A) Chameleon<br />\n B) Lion<br />\n C) Mask<br />\n D) Paintbrush</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>\n ANSWERS<br />\n 1) Albert Bond Lambert won a silver medal in golf at the 1904 Summer Olympics in St. Louis.<br />\n 2) Cary Elwes, John Cleese, Sean Connery and Russell Crowe all have played Robin Hood on screen.<br />\n 3) Ranger Rick is a raccoon.<br />\n 4) One dash in Morse code signifies the letter T.<br />\n 5) Candy Lightner founded MADD (Mothers Against Drunk Driving) in October 1980.<br />\n 6) A chameleon was pictured on insignias of both the French and American camouflage units in World War I.</p>\n', created = 1574391458, expire = 1574477858, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:da327abef268e128e4310e7d4d8c5452' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
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  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p>LESLIE&rsquo;S TRIVIA BITS: October 14, 2019</p>\n<p>When Christopher Columbus was cruising around the West Indies in 1492, he took note of the hanging beds used by the local Taino people. It&rsquo;s possible that his diary entry for Oct. 17, 1492, was the first written mention of those woven cotton sling beds that kept sleeping people off the ground and away from critters and creepy-crawlies at night. The Taino called the beds &ldquo;hamacas,&rdquo; which is where we get the word &ldquo;hammock.&rdquo;</p>\n<p> THE FIRST athlete to host &ldquo;Saturday Night Live&rdquo; was NFL Hall of Fame quarterback Fran Tarkenton. He hosted on Jan. 29, 1977, a couple of weeks after his Minnesota Vikings lost to the Oakland Raiders in Super Bowl XI.<br />\n Two common cross spiders (Araneus diadematus) named Anita and Arabella went into space with NASA astronauts on a Skylab mission in 1973. They were part of an experiment devised by high school student Judith Miles to test whether weightlessness would affect a spider&rsquo;s ability to spin a web. Both spiders spun webs in space once they&rsquo;d acclimated to their extraterrestrial environment. After they died, their bodies were placed in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian.<br />\n The term &ldquo;cliffhanger&rdquo; originated in the 1930s to describe serialized radio shows and silent films that ended at a critical moment &mdash; sometimes literally with a character hanging from a cliff &mdash; to ensure audiences would tune in for the next episode. Its first known use was in a 1931 issue of &ldquo;Variety,&rdquo; the film industry trade magazine known for popularizing the terms &ldquo;biopic,&rdquo; &ldquo;sitcom&rdquo; and &ldquo;striptease,&rdquo; among many others.<br />\n When Lord Horatio Nelson was shot and killed at the Battle of Trafalgar on Oct. 21, 1805, the naval surgeon aboard Nelson&rsquo;s ship, HMS Victory, preserved the body by sealing it in a large cask of brandy. There it remained until it returned to England in December 1805. According to the surgeon&rsquo;s report, when the cask was opened, the &ldquo;undecayed state (of Nelson&rsquo;s body) after a lapse of two months since death ... excited the surprise of all who beheld it.&rdquo;</p>\n<p> THE FIRST female police officer in the United States was Marie Owens, who joined the Chicago Police Department in the 1890s working primarily on abuses of child labor laws. She was, as the Chicago Tribune said, &ldquo;the only woman detective sergeant in the world,&rdquo; but she was just the first. Lola Greene Baldwin became a police officer in Portland, Oregon, in 1908. In 1910, Alice Stebbins Wells joined the Los Angeles Police Department. She received a badge, a rulebook and a first aid manual, but she had to design and sew her own uniform.</p>\n<p> TRIVIA<br />\n 1. The present-day name of what island group comes from the Carib word for a marine crocodile?<br />\n A) Antilles<br />\n B) Bahamas<br />\n C) Cayman Islands<br />\n D) Hebrides<br />\n 2. According to Norse mythology and comic books, Thor carries Mjolnir, which is what type of weapon?<br />\n A) Hammer<br />\n B) Spear<br />\n C) Sword<br />\n D) Whip<br />\n 3. The Saturn V rocket was the launch vehicle for Skylab and which other NASA space program?<br />\n A) Apollo<br />\n B) Gemini<br />\n C) Mercury<br />\n D) Voyager<br />\n 4. What makes the White Cliffs of Dover white?<br />\n A) Agate<br />\n B) Chalk<br />\n C) Paint<br />\n D) Quartz<br />\n 5. Slivovitz is brandy distilled from what fruit?<br />\n A) Apple<br />\n B) Peach<br />\n C) Pear<br />\n D) Plum<br />\n 6. Which of these was NOT an album by The Police?<br />\n A) &ldquo;Argybargy&rdquo;<br />\n B) &ldquo;Outlandos d&rsquo;Amour&rdquo;<br />\n C) &ldquo;Reggatta de Blanc&rdquo;<br />\n D) &ldquo;Zenyatta Mondatta&rdquo;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>&nbsp;</p>\n<p>\n ANSWERS</p>\n<p> 1) The Cayman Islands take their name from the caiman, a type of crocodile.<br />\n 2) Mjolnir is Thor&rsquo;s hammer.<br />\n 3) The Saturn V rocket was the launch vehicle for the Apollo space program.<br />\n 4) The White Cliffs of Dover are chalk cliffs.<br />\n 5) Slivovitz is plum brandy.<br />\n 6) &ldquo;Argybargy&rdquo; was a 1980 album by Squeeze.</p>\n', created = 1574391458, expire = 1574477858, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:d69d7179693bb32798661bdece9a1014' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
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Leslie Elman

11/19/2019 - 9:37pm
TRIVIA BITS: November 18, 2019   The Caribbean island nation of Dominica is the only country with a parrot on its national flag. Specifically, it’s a Sisserou parrot, an endangered species found only in the rainforests of Dominica. The flag was designed in 1978 when Dominica became independent from the United Kingdom. At the time, the purple-breasted parrot had its back to the flagpole...
11/12/2019 - 10:14pm
TRIVIA BITS: November 11, 2019 Whether American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) are born male or female depends on the temperature where the eggs incubate before they hatch. Below 86 degrees Fahrenheit, they’ll all be female. Above 91.2 degrees, they’ll be male. At temperatures in between, the hatchlings will be a mix of males...
11/06/2019 - 11:49am
TRIVIA BITS: November 4, 2019 Akira Kurosawa, legendary director of “Rashomon” and “Seven Samurai” (which inspired the western classic “The Magnificent Seven”), was a baseball fan. In fact, his 1949 noir film “Stray Dog” has a pivotal scene at a baseball game between the Yomiuri Giants and the Nankai...
10/29/2019 - 9:23pm
TRIVIA BITS: October 28, 2019 If you’re the sort of person who enjoys spotting goofs in major motion pictures, pay attention to the car license plates on screen. You’ll never run out of goofs to spot, from plates with the wrong design for the movie’s time period, to that pesky question of which states require front plates and...
10/22/2019 - 9:12pm
TRIVIA BITS: October 21, 2019 In 2016, Portugal won the Union of European Footbal Associations soccer championship; superstar player Cristiano Ronaldo topped the Forbes magazine list of the world’s highest paid athletes; and the airport in his hometown of Funchal on the island of Madeira was renamed in his honor. With that, Ronaldo joined a...
10/16/2019 - 12:30pm
LESLIE’S TRIVIA BITS: October 14, 2019 When Christopher Columbus was cruising around the West Indies in 1492, he took note of the hanging beds used by the local Taino people. It’s possible that his diary entry for Oct. 17, 1492, was the first written mention of those woven cotton sling beds that kept sleeping people off the ground and...
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