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  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p>VIRGINIA COLONY: August 2, 2019</p>\n<p><img alt=\"\" src=\"http://conservativechronicle.com/sites/default/files/Olasky.gif\" /></p>\n<p>My last column in &ldquo;WORLD&rdquo; noted the good mood&nbsp;400 years ago&nbsp;at the July 30, 1619, inaugural meeting of Virginia&rsquo;s General Assembly. The assembly wanted to maintain peace with the Powhatan tribe and promote &ldquo;the Conversion of the Indians to Christian Religion.&rdquo;<br />\n James Horn in his book&nbsp;&ldquo;1619&rdquo;&nbsp;shows how settlers and natives fought for several years after the Jamestown founding in 1607, but seven years later the marriage of Powhatan princess Pocahontas and settler John Rolfe improved relations.&nbsp; &nbsp;</p>\n<p> CHURCHGOERS throughout England in 1616 and 1617 donated shillings to establish Virginia schools for teaching natives. Exhibit A was Pocahontas herself, who professed faith in Christ and took the name Rebecca. The Rolfes voyaged to England, where Rebecca was the guest of honor at some gatherings and a novelty item at others. She met King James I: One cleric, Samuel Purchas, wrote that she impressed London because she &ldquo;carried her selfe as the daughter of a king.&rdquo;<br />\n As the Rolfes in 1617 started back for America, Pocahontas, age 20 or 21, became gravely ill and died. That harmed settler/Powhatan relations. So did mistreatment of natives by settlers such as John Martin: The General Assembly chastised him in 1619 when one of his employees forcibly took corn from Indians, giving them in return copper beads and trinkets. The assembly said &ldquo;such outrages as this might breed danger and loss of life to others of the Colony.&rdquo;<br />\n Virginia Company leader Edwin Sandys, who dreamed of a biracial Christian society, reported in November 1620 &mdash; the month the Pilgrims landed in Massachusetts &mdash; that the &ldquo;noble Action for the planting of Virginia with Christian Religion&rdquo; was progressing. In 1621 the company instructed Virginia Gov. Francis Wyatt to make sure the colonists did not bring any &ldquo;injury or oppression&rdquo; against the Indians that would disturb &ldquo;the present peace&rdquo; and revive &ldquo;ancient quarrels (now buried).&rdquo;<br />\n Wyatt in January 1622 told Londoners the settlers lived &ldquo;in very great amity and confidence with the natives.&rdquo; John Rolfe died that year, but Thomas Rolfe, his son by Pocahontas, was now 7. He was the biracial hope. But the Englishmen did not know, or did not wish to know, the true feelings of natives who had lost many of their hunting grounds and saw more settlers coming to take their lands.</p>\n<p> THEN CAME not 9/11 but 3/22. On March 22, 1622, native warriors suddenly attacked settlers&rsquo; homes and farms, killing about 350. One of the dead was George Thorpe, who had said the colonists showed &ldquo;love and hearty affection&rdquo; by giving the natives clothing and household items. Thorpe had said he and Powhatan Chief Opechancanough were friends. He had said the Indians were close to embracing Christ.<br />\n Thorpe misread them, and all England was angry. The Virginia Company recruited hundreds of new settlers and said giving up would be &ldquo;a Sin against the dead.&rdquo; The newcomers came to defeat terrorism &ldquo;contrary to all laws of God and men,&rdquo; since the natives had attacked &ldquo;under the Color of unsuspected amity.&rdquo;<br />\n Chief Opechancanough misread the settlers. He told his tribesmen that after March 22 the English would evacuate Virginia before &ldquo;two Moons.&rdquo; Nope: The Virginia Company ordered a &ldquo;perpetual&rdquo; war against the natives that would include &ldquo;burning their Towns, demolishing their Temples, destroying their Canoes, ... carrying away their Corn.&rdquo;<br />\n King James I shipped the Virginians 1,000 muskets, 1,000 battle-axes, 2,000 helmets, and 540 coats and shirts of mail. In 1623 the natives said they wanted peace, but colonists meeting with natives under the color of amity took revenge by serving poisoned wine that at least sickened them. The Virginians then opened fire, killing about 50.<br />\n Talk of Englishmen and natives living in peace also died. The settlers enslaved some natives, but they often ran off. When a strain of tobacco John Rolfe had invented became wildly popular in England, Virginia land turned into tobacco fields tended by slaves from Africa. In 1860, a half-million slaves lived in what still called itself a commonwealth.</p>\n<p> FOR A TIME Thomas Rolfe may have wavered between the English and native worlds. In 1641 he visited his native uncle, Opechancanough. In 1646 he apparently chose the English world and became a lieutenant in Virginia&rsquo;s military, charged with suppressing his cousins.</p>\n<p> Reprinted with permission of WORLD. To read more news and views from a Christian perspective, call 800-951-6397 or visit WNG.org.<br />\n &nbsp;</p>\n', created = 1575618773, expire = 1575705173, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:f77252e93183da350e8e5deedc889c38' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
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  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p>HUMOR: November 13, 2018</p>\n<p><img alt=\"\" src=\"http://conservativechronicle.com/sites/default/files/Olasky.gif\" /></p>\n<p>Early in this decade I produced a column of jokes for a WORLD issue each April at income tax filing time. I fell out of practice, but one reader last month said he would need some humor when contemplating election results &mdash; and that week, providentially, I picked up a new book,&nbsp;&ldquo;Wit&rsquo;s End&rdquo;&nbsp;by James Geary, and also received from a playwright friend, Kenan Minkoff, some of his unpublished humor.<br />\n &ldquo;Wit&rsquo;s End&rdquo;&nbsp;includes wordplay like &ldquo;There was pandamonium at the zoo when the bamboo ran out,&rdquo; and &ldquo;Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana.&rdquo; It has life-or-death wit like that displayed by a man sentenced to death but allowed to choose his own method of execution: The man said, &ldquo;Old age.&rdquo;</p>\n<p> GEARY ALSO helps us deal with snobs. He tells of one messy eater who sat across the table from an arrogant noble. The noble sneered, &ldquo;What separates you from a pig?&rdquo; The wit replied, &ldquo;The table.&rdquo; Similarly, an intellectual lady at a meeting snapped at the farmer sitting next to her, &ldquo;I don&rsquo;t like having a fool by my side.&rdquo; The farmer replied, &ldquo;I don&rsquo;t mind.&rdquo;<br />\n And I like Groucho Marx&rsquo;s quip when he entered a restaurant and saw his former wife at a table: &ldquo;Marx spots the ex.&rdquo; Which leads me to one of Kenan Minkoff&rsquo;s maxims concerning moral turpitude: &ldquo;Where there is a will, there is a way out.&rdquo; He also writes about gardening (and covetousness): &ldquo;Whoever says the grass is greener doesn&rsquo;t have to mow it.&rdquo; And Kenan notes one problem with &ldquo;free love:&rdquo; &ldquo;You get what you pay for.&rdquo;<br />\n Turning back to politics, Kenan notes that older voters assert the Right to Dye, which faces opposition from the &ldquo;Gray Rights&rdquo; movement. And some of us fight for the Right to Strife by ascribing vile motivations to political opponents. The Right to Bare Arms is worth upholding, except that extremists move on to bare bellies, which is a privilege, not a right.<br />\n Freedom to Want also has stout defenders: Kenan defines it as the right of all people regardless of resources or economic productivity to have access to nonessential consumer goods. This right eliminates any differences among the English words &ldquo;want,&rdquo; &ldquo;need,&rdquo; &ldquo;desire,&rdquo; &ldquo;whim,&rdquo; and &ldquo;basic human necessity.&rdquo; Along with this right comes moral outrage about people who practice fiscal restraint before buying things they do not &ldquo;need.&rdquo;<br />\n In WORLD&rsquo;s Policybook, I note different ways journalists might look at Jack and Jill: She&rsquo;s a devoted wife who puts her career on hold to tumble down the hill after her husband, or she&rsquo;s a feminist who pushes her klutzy companion. But Kenan does me better with his American Psychiatric Association analysis of Goldilocks, who tests boundaries by engaging in high-risk eating, sitting, and sleeping behaviors.</p>\n<p> KENAN ALSO gives the Womyn&rsquo;s Studies version: Goldie escapes from a patriarchy where Eurocentric visiodominant attitudes have fetishized her blond hair. In the woods, though, she enters the &ldquo;Golden Cage&rdquo; of heteronormative femininity via a bed and chair that are uncomfortably soft.<br />\n (And don&rsquo;t forget the socialist interpretation: Goldilocks represents capitalists and their &ldquo;gold&rdquo; that &ldquo;locks&rdquo; workers in perpetual servitude. Capitalists consume workers&rsquo; food, destroy their child&rsquo;s chair, and even steal their very sleep by co-opting their beds. We must re-educate blondes, redistribute porridge, and make all beds and chairs equally uncomfortable.)<br />\n Kenan could not resist razzing the left. He says you&rsquo;re a Progressive if you think that moral principles undergirding Western civilization should be disposable, but diapers should not be; if you&rsquo;re sure God does not exist but aliens do; if you see the Ten Commandments and the Constitution as jumping-off points for negotiation; if you can&rsquo;t judge the content of someone&rsquo;s character until you know the color of his skin.<br />\n Furthermore, he says you&rsquo;re a Progressive if you think your indulgences are rights and my rights are indulgences; if you think our borders should be open, but Walmart should not be; if you&rsquo;ve had your consciousness raised by an Oscar acceptance speech; if you have more compassion for trees than for people on life support; if you think history definitively proves that capitalism doesn&rsquo;t work, but communism would, if &ldquo;done right.&rdquo;</p>\n<p> BUT SERIOUSLY, folks, with elections done for now we&rsquo;re still blessed with alternatives to the answer a North Korean will give you if asked how things are there: &ldquo;I can&rsquo;t complain.&rdquo;</p>\n<p> Reprinted with permission of WORLD. To read more news and views from a Christian perspective, call 800-951-6397 or visit WNG.org.<br />\n &nbsp;</p>\n', created = 1575618773, expire = 1575705173, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:8df3e77a65ea6ea98ccfa0d8cc8b80e2' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
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  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p>WELFARE: November 2, 2018</p>\n<p><img alt=\"\" src=\"http://conservativechronicle.com/sites/default/files/Olasky.gif\" /></p>\n<p>Bookstores now display literary efforts with titles like&nbsp;&ldquo;A History of the World in 6 Glasses&rdquo; &mdash; and I&rsquo;m up to a challenge. Here, in honor of the splendid 2018 major league season, is a history of helping the poor in America in terms of three ballparks.<br />\n American aid to the poor a century ago was like the newly opened Fenway Park. Chairs and concourses were narrow. Some seats had obstructed views. But fans were close to the action, and the park had weird elements like a 37-foot-high wall eventually dubbed the Green Monster. It turned some high fly ball outs into home runs and some line drive home runs (in other ballparks) into doubles or even into singles.</p>\n<p> PREMODERN American compassion was like Fenway Park because churches and synagogues were close to the action &mdash; and had been for two centuries. Some were narrow, but they offered challenging, personal, and spiritual help to immigrants like my grandparents. Premodern ballparks often were idiosyncratic, with weird angles and not much foul territory, but they displayed human-scale liveliness.<br />\n In the 1960s urban planners and ambitious owners demolished most of the old ballparks and substituted Great Multi-Purpose Stadiums that went along with Lyndon Johnson&rsquo;s Great Society. The modern venues had uniform foul lines and wider seats and concourses, but often seemed cold and antiseptic. Round for football rather than configured for baseball, they had lots of foul territory: Many foul balls that used to reach the seats and give hitters another chance became boring outs.<br />\n The federal welfare system was similarly symmetrical. Rules and regulations replaced personal help. The system offered uniformity: If you have income x and number of children y you can count on getting welfare check z, regardless of values or willingness to work. The system had tens of millions of seats.<br />\n Happily, only the Oakland Coliseum remains from the 1960s building boom. Starting in the 1990s, cities across America replaced Great Stadiums with postmodern ballparks: First came Camden Yards in Baltimore, and then beauties like PNC Park in Pittsburgh, AT&amp;T Park in San Francisco, and Safeco Field in Seattle. Postmodern ballparks are asymmetrical like the classical parks, with walls of different heights and foul lines of different lengths. They hug the old but enjoy the new, with wider seats and concourses.</p>\n<p> REPUBLICAN speechifiers orating about the welfare reform bill that became law in 1996 said they had torn down the all-purpose welfare stadium. Not so: We have about 80 different federal welfare programs, and Aid to Families with Dependent Children (now called Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) was only one of them: Essentially, we merely removed the stands behind the foul pole in left field.<br />\n So here&rsquo;s the problem: Where are the PNC Parks and Safeco Fields of the welfare system? They don&rsquo;t exist. We know every person has a unique set of circumstances, needs and values. We also know cities differ, but we prefer uniformity (equated with fairness). For decades experts and would-be experts have proposed changes, but politicians and pundits typically strangle proposals at birth, saying they won&rsquo;t work because our society has hugely changed over the past century.<br />\n Some say we can&rsquo;t learn from the old ballparks or the old charity systems &mdash; but it&rsquo;s still 90 feet to first base. Probably about the same percentage of Americans become addicted to alcohol and drugs as in 1912. Many who are affluent have to travel farther to help those in the poorer part of town, but it doesn&rsquo;t take more time to get there. Manufacturing jobs have given way to service ones, but in most parts of the country jobs are still available for anyone who wants to work &mdash; and working conditions are better. Racism was a problem then and remains a problem now.<br />\n The biggest changes in the past century involve beliefs, values, family formation or non-formation, and education. Marriage rates are down. More kids grow up without the sense of right and wrong once gained from either earthly fathers or our Father in heaven. Schools pretend that almost everyone should go to college, so millions graduate or drop out without work skills.</p>\n<p> LET&rsquo;S FIND a way to unite old virtues with new opportunities. Otherwise, we&rsquo;re stuck with the Oakland Coliseum, which now has two enormous scoreboards so fans who get bored between innings can watch dot races. Bread and circuses, as in Rome&rsquo;s Coliseum.</p>\n<p> Reprinted with permission of WORLD. To read more news and views from a Christian perspective, call 800-951-6397 or visit WNG.org.</p>\n', created = 1575618773, expire = 1575705173, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:5a5a0f6fa78fe07ba70cf20cce994006' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
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  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p>BOOK REVIEW: October 26, 2018</p>\n<p><img alt=\"\" src=\"http://conservativechronicle.com/sites/default/files/Olasky.gif\" /></p>\n<p>Frequently asked question by&nbsp; WORLD members: What do you think of Andy Stanley&rsquo;s book,&nbsp;&ldquo;Irresistible&rdquo;&nbsp;(Zondervan, 2018)?<br />\n Answer: I&rsquo;m impressed and depressed. Stanley notes rightly that &ldquo;skinny jeans and moving lights&rdquo; won&rsquo;t keep many young people from abandoning Christianity. But he argues that the way to hold them, and win others who say they&rsquo;re &ldquo;spiritual,&rdquo; is to abandon the hard things in the Bible and emphasize a smiling Jesus. C.S. Lewis brought us&nbsp;&ldquo;Mere Christianity.&rdquo; Pastor Stanley brings us Mere Sponge Cake.</p>\n<p> IS THAT A harsh review? Let&rsquo;s take a run through&nbsp;&ldquo;Irresistible.&rdquo; Its first 80 pages winsomely and validly critique vanilla church life. Stanley&rsquo;s complaints get more pointed on page 90 when he complains about Old Testament &ldquo;leftovers&rdquo; (and does that five times in five pages). He clarifies this on page 137: &ldquo;The Ten Commandments have no authority over you. None. To be clear: Thou shalt not obey the Ten Commandments.&rdquo;<br />\n How bad is the OT? On page 144 we learn, &ldquo;It only takes a small dose of the wrong thing to corrupt the whole thing. Even a pinch of the old covenant will corrupt the taste and texture of the new covenant.&rdquo; But &mdash; page 166 &mdash; the OT &ldquo;is a fabulous source of inspiration. Old Testament narratives are rich in courage, valor, and sacrifice. Everybody faces a Goliath or two.&rdquo;<br />\n That sounds like Steve Martin&rsquo;s comically inspirational speech about a bandit leader in&nbsp;&ldquo;Three Amigos:&rdquo; &ldquo;In a way, all of us have an El Guapo to face someday. For some, shyness might be their El Guapo. For others, a lack of education might be their El Guapo.&rdquo; How many bad sermons start with a Bible verse, turn to contemporary issues or what the pastor did on his vacation, and never get back to what the Bible is actually saying?<br />\n But back to Stanley&rsquo;s book: His prescription on page 227 is, &ldquo;If we&nbsp;love&nbsp;well, all&nbsp;is&nbsp;well. Period. That&rsquo;s it. Love well, and you&rsquo;re in the light.&rdquo; That&rsquo;s different from the OT teaching he describes on pages 251 and 257, &ldquo;In the Old Testament [God] got so angry, he drowned &rsquo;em all.&thinsp; ... He allowed his own temple to be torn down and then put everybody in time-out.&thinsp;... [Now,] he&rsquo;s not angry.&rdquo;</p>\n<p> WHAT&rsquo;S THE problem with Stanleyism? First, his description of the two testaments &mdash; anger-suffused old vs. love-infused new &mdash; is inaccurate. The OT more than 20 times shows the &ldquo;angry&rdquo; God emphasizing compassion. The New Testament concludes with Chapter 9 of Revelation showing one-third of mankind slain, Chapter 14 reporting a 180-mile-long, four-foot-deep stream of blood, and Chapter 16 describing plagues worse than those in Exodus.<br />\n Second, Jesus warns against attacks on the OT. He says in Chapter 16 of Luke, &ldquo;If they do not hear Moses and the Prophets, neither will they be convinced if someone should rise from the dead.&rdquo; Jesus in Chapter 5 of John tells critics that if they don&rsquo;t believe what Moses wrote, &ldquo;how will you believe my words?&rdquo; He declares in the Sermon on the Mount, &ldquo;Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them.&rdquo;&nbsp;Stanley mentions on page 168 one verse countering his thesis, &ldquo;All Scripture is God-breathed,&rdquo; but he doesn&rsquo;t engage with it. Stanley doesn&rsquo;t even mention other Biblical teaching that undercuts his thesis.<br />\n Third, if we unhitch the church from the OT, we lose its powerful documentation of how deep our sin problem is: Choose a people, give them chosen leaders and prophets, give them a land and good laws, and they still mess up. Plus, the OT repeatedly points to the NT: Abraham&rsquo;s almost-sacrifice of his only son makes no sense unless it&rsquo;s preparing us for God the Father&rsquo;s sacrifice of His only Son. Stanley makes it seem he&rsquo;s discovered something, but he&rsquo;s largely repeating the 1,900-year-old anti-OT errors of Marcion and the 100-year-old errors of liberal preachers and writers such as Harry Emerson Fosdick.</p>\n<p> FOURTH, Stanley&rsquo;s wrong to say that it&rsquo;s his way or the highway for postmoderns. New York pastor Tim Keller&rsquo;s full-Bible exegetical preaching has reached thousands of those Stanley sees as unreachable unless we jettison the OT. The intelligent design movement is showing we don&rsquo;t have to worship Darwin. Maybe Stanley can draw in readers and listeners with sponge cake, but they will need more nutrition.</p>\n<p> Reprinted with permission of WORLD. To read more news and views from a Christian perspective, call 800-951-6397 or visit WNG.org.</p>\n', created = 1575618773, expire = 1575705173, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:1b5ce49556f3d92692de8dc1a2507998' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
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  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p>PROHIBITION: October 15, 2018</p>\n<p><img alt=\"\" src=\"http://conservativechronicle.com/sites/default/files/Olasky.gif\" style=\"width: 300px; height: 116px;\" /></p>\n<p>My last column, which explained how alcohol prohibition made it into the Constitution 100 years ago, included this sentence: &ldquo;Beer&rsquo;s connection to German brewers &mdash; the United Brewery Workers&rsquo; constitution required that it&rsquo;s president speak German &mdash; hurt it&rsquo;s wartime standing.&rdquo;<br />\n Many of you probably noticed the twice-evident grammar error: Should be &ldquo;its,&rdquo; not &ldquo;it&rsquo;s.&rdquo; Many of you wrote in, some mournfully and some perhaps joyfully:&nbsp;&lsquo;The editor committed a fundamental grammar sin.&rsquo;&nbsp;Except I didn&rsquo;t: The file I sent had &ldquo;its&rdquo; correctly. We checked our production records. The culprit confessed and apologized. That same person has saved me from other errors over the years.</p>\n<p> PROHIBITION saved many Americans from more serious errors. In 2006 Jack Blocker wrote in the&nbsp;American Journal of Public Health&nbsp;that arrests for drunkenness, hospital admissions for alcoholic psychosis, and death rates from cirrhosis and alcoholism all dropped. Arrests for disorderly conduct, delinquency, assaults, wife-beating, and even prostitution apparently declined as well.<br />\n Interpretations of the data vary. Temperance movements had brought about less drinking even before the law changed. As historian James Timberlake relates in&nbsp;&ldquo;Prohibition and the Progressive Movement,&rdquo; the entire bill for a month of lunches and dinners at New York City&rsquo;s Advertising Club in 1916 came to only $30, which means that only one diner in 40 had taken a drink with his meal. That year the senior class of Columbia College concluded its graduation exercises with the &ldquo;Columbia Drinking Song&rdquo; &mdash; and then drank tea.<br />\n The voluntary movement toward temperance ended when Prohibition changed the absence of liquor from a progressive reform to, in the eyes of many culture-shapers and young people, the emblem of a suffocating status quo. As a&nbsp;New York Times&nbsp;reviewer summarized movies showing Jazz Age society, &ldquo;No such picture would be considered properly finished without a number of scenes depicting the shaking up and drinking down of cocktails.&rdquo; One content analysis of 115 films produced in 1930 found drinking, often by heroes, depicted in two-thirds of them.<br />\n Some journalists saw Prohibition as class warfare: It eliminated workers&rsquo; jobs at breweries and discriminated against those who could not afford higher prices. Many Americans favored a measure that would ban hard liquor while allowing beer and wine, but Prohibitionists had pushed for all or nothing: For a time they had all.</p>\n<p> THAT SEEMED like a winning position when the 1928 election pitted &ldquo;dry&rdquo; Herbert Hoover against &ldquo;wet&rdquo; Al Smith. In what some called a referendum on Prohibition, Hoover won big. Economics was key. Methodist bishop Thomas Nicholson, who moonlighted as president of the Anti-Saloon League, said bank deposits were growing, more Americans were buying life insurance, and valuations of church property have increased by the millions.&rdquo;<br />\n During the Depression, the biggest factor in changing public opinion was economic.&nbsp;The Christian Herald&nbsp;in 1928 had called Prohibition &ldquo;the essential element in our present prosperity. If we modify prohibition, we modify that prosperity.&rdquo; Starting in 1930, though, leading newspapers suggested that modifying Prohibition would modify poverty. Reopening breweries and bars would create jobs and pump up government revenue. Liberals said government could then distribute cash to suffering families. Conservatives said taxes could be reduced.<br />\n Advocates had equated Prohibition with virtue. The most effective seller of Prohibition through much of the 1920s was Methodist Bishop James Cannon, Jr.: H. L. Mencken opined, &ldquo;Congress was his troop of Boy Scouts and Presidents trembled whenever his name was mentioned.&rdquo; But financial accusations brought Cannon before a grand jury, and in July 1930 newspaper headlines screamed about his adultery with his secretary. Critics of Prohibition had long argued that many church-based Prohibitionists were law-breakers themselves: Now they had a poster boy.</p>\n<p> PROHIBITION forces in 1928 could have preserved much of what they had won by modifying the law to allow beer and light wine. Many equated compromise with treason. By 1930 only 30 percent of 4.8 million respondents in a&nbsp;&ldquo;Literary Digest&rdquo;&nbsp;poll favored maintaining prohibition as is, but 59 percent still supported it as long as beer and light wine could return. In 1931, even a majority of members of a commission Hoover appointed favored allowing beer and light wine, but he refused to budge.</p>\n<p> Reprinted with permission of WORLD. To read more news and views from a Christian perspective, call 800-951-6397 or visit WNG.org.<br />\n &nbsp;</p>\n', created = 1575618773, expire = 1575705173, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:1735234585dba1a13dc5c80e2f6cc56a' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
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  • user warning: Table './conserva_drupal/cache_filter' is marked as crashed and should be repaired query: UPDATE cache_filter SET data = '<p>PROHIBITION: October 1, 2018</p>\n<p><img alt=\"\" src=\"http://conservativechronicle.com/sites/default/files/Olasky.gif\" /></p>\n<p>In September 1918 the Boston Red Sox won the World Series. Some boys pasted a diamond-shaped sticker onto their baseball bats: &ldquo;Speed! Aim! Ambition! Make a good ball player. Liquor injures all three. Ask the Red Sox.&rdquo; It was a time of wild baseball optimism in Massachusetts &mdash; yet the next World Series win wouldn&rsquo;t come until 2004.</p>\n<p> SOME BOSTON draftees that fall journeyed 38 miles northwest to Fort Devens, preparing for travel to France to finish off the Germans. It was a time of wild optimism regarding future peace as the War to End War ended, but many of those soldiers never left Fort Devens: They were victims of an influenza pandemic that killed probably 50 million people worldwide, including 675,000 in the United States. (And a second world war, even more destructive than the first, started only 21 years later.)<br />\n But one reason for optimism engaged many Christians especially. More than two-thirds of U.S. senators and representatives had voted for a constitutional amendment to prohibit the manufacture and sale of all liquor in the United States. By January 1919 three-fourths of the states had approved it. Prohibition became law the following January, inaugurating a roaring decade in which some thought the Millennium cometh.<br />\n The Prohibition campaign had tied legal liquor to many kinds of social decay. A study of paupers in 10 states found 2 in 5 owed their plight to liquor. A physician found that 70 percent of all men under 25 who contracted venereal disease had done so after heavy drinking. Church leaders equated drinking with Sabbath-breaking and adultery. More than 5,000 of the 5,820 saloons in Manhattan and the Bronx defied blue laws by opening on Sunday, in the process bribing local constables. Prostitutes frequented Chicago saloons, which often displayed erotic paintings or posters furnished by beer companies.<br />\n A University of Texas collection of pamphlets from the 1920s displays the exuberance of advocates who said Prohibition would transform America. Evangelist (and former ballplayer) Billy Sunday declared, &ldquo;The reign of tears is over.&thinsp;... Slums will soon be only a memory. We will turn our prisons into factories and jails into storehouses.&rdquo; The Woman&rsquo;s Christian Temperance Union equated Prohibition with happy homes. Rev. A.C. Bane dubbed the campaign against alcohol &ldquo;humanity&rsquo;s greatest battle,&rdquo; and said the United States would now advance &ldquo;with the spirit of the missionary and the crusader to help drive the demon of drink from all civilization.&rdquo;</p>\n<p> THROUGHOUT THE 1920s some Americans pushed for repeal of Prohibition, but the Texas senator who had authored the 18th Amendment, Morris Sheppard, saw as much chance of repealing it &ldquo;as there is for a hummingbird to fly to the planet Mars with the Washington Monument tied to its tail.&rdquo; After all, Prohibition and prosperity began with the same three letters: Put the money saved by not drinking into the stock market and grow rich, since the market would always go up and up and up.<br />\n But Prohibition advocacy had two soft spots. One was potential: What if prosperity declined? Another was based in class and ethnicity: Workingmen, particularly of German and Irish descent, didn&rsquo;t see why beer that gave them a buzz should be classed with hard liquor. During the world war, beer could be no more than 2.75 percent alcohol, and even with the 18th Amendment &mdash; which prohibited &ldquo;intoxicating&rdquo; beverages but didn&rsquo;t define that word &mdash; many had expected beer of moderate strength to remain legal.<br />\n Nevertheless, prohibitionists intoxicated with success pushed Congress to set the legal limit at 0.5 percent. Beer&rsquo;s connection to German brewers &mdash; the United Brewery Workers&rsquo; constitution required that its president speak German &mdash; hurt its wartime standing. The Anti-Saloon League said, &ldquo;The worst of all our German enemies, the most treacherous, the most menacing are Pabst, Schlitz, Blatz, and Miller.&thinsp;... German brewers in this country have rendered thousands of men inefficient, and are thus crippling the Republic in its war on Prussian militarism.&rdquo;</p>\n<p> CONGRESS PASSED the Volstead Act, which prohibited everything alcoholic. The number of breweries cratered from 1,300 to zero. Tens of thousands of workers in those businesses lost their jobs. The Coors Brewing Company started producing malted milk and porcelain products. Democratic presidential candidate Al Smith proposed in 1928 that beer be allowed. He lost badly to Herbert Hoover.</p>\n<p> Reprinted with permission of WORLD. To read more news and views from a Christian perspective, call 800-951-6397 or visit WNG.org.<br />\n &nbsp;</p>\n', created = 1575618773, expire = 1575705173, headers = '', serialized = 0 WHERE cid = '2:f873defe212b55f61cd85d517968c7ca' in /home/conserva/public_html/includes/cache.inc on line 112.
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Marvin Olasky

08/04/2019 - 5:55pm
VIRGINIA COLONY: August 2, 2019 My last column in “WORLD” noted the good mood 400 years ago at the July 30, 1619, inaugural meeting of Virginia’s General Assembly. The assembly wanted to maintain peace with the Powhatan tribe and promote “the Conversion of the Indians to Christian Religion.” James Horn in his book “1619” shows how...
11/14/2018 - 9:36am
HUMOR: November 13, 2018 Early in this decade I produced a column of jokes for a WORLD issue each April at income tax filing time. I fell out of practice, but one reader last month said he would need some humor when contemplating election results — and that week, providentially, I picked up a new book, “Wit’s End”...
11/05/2018 - 10:59am
WELFARE: November 2, 2018 Bookstores now display literary efforts with titles like “A History of the World in 6 Glasses” — and I’m up to a challenge. Here, in honor of the splendid 2018 major league season, is a history of helping the poor in America in terms of three ballparks. American aid to the poor a century ago...
10/30/2018 - 6:41pm
BOOK REVIEW: October 26, 2018 Frequently asked question by  WORLD members: What do you think of Andy Stanley’s book, “Irresistible” (Zondervan, 2018)? Answer: I’m impressed and depressed. Stanley notes rightly that “skinny jeans and moving lights” won’t keep many young people from...
10/15/2018 - 4:23pm
PROHIBITION: October 15, 2018 My last column, which explained how alcohol prohibition made it into the Constitution 100 years ago, included this sentence: “Beer’s connection to German brewers — the United Brewery Workers’ constitution required that it’s president speak German — hurt it’s wartime standing...
10/01/2018 - 12:10pm
PROHIBITION: October 1, 2018 In September 1918 the Boston Red Sox won the World Series. Some boys pasted a diamond-shaped sticker onto their baseball bats: “Speed! Aim! Ambition! Make a good ball player. Liquor injures all three. Ask the Red Sox.” It was a time of wild baseball optimism in Massachusetts — yet the next World...
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